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New Avanti questions


KWOL
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I just picked up an Avanti that I am going to restore to a driver.  I will have some questions and probably some parts requests.

Here's some pictures of it sitting next to my 59 edsel.

IMG_20210711_164847.jpg

IMG_20210711_164905.jpg

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Here's a list ( not in any order)

Front brakes install upgrade kit ( have )

Rear brakes install cylinders and shoed (have)

Brake lines replace with cunifer

Gauges install and wire

Front turn signals purchase and install

Carpet install

U joints purchase and install

Shocks purchase and install

Left front spring install

Left sway bar mount straighten

Diff and axles inspect and fill/ pack

Cooling system replace hoses and fill

Wipers and washer Test and fix

Scuttle vent clean and prime

Dash panel install

Fix left rear wing hole

Fix grill opening crack

Left rear window latch purchase and install

Fuel pump rebuild

Body prep and paint

Wheels replace

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Let me also suggest that you inspect the "hog troughs" and frame for rust. As you probably know these are the areas of the Avanti that are prone to deteriation and it's better to evaluate and repair before others fixes on the list as a complete repair could entail removing the body from the frame or cutting the rocker panels lose and then glassing them back in if the hog troughs need replacing.

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Also check the windshield frame and a pillars, especially under the windshield reveal molding on the sides of the windshield. Quite often these items are completely rusted away. They can be replaced, but at a substantial cost.

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10 hours ago, Avanti83 said:

Let me also suggest that you inspect the "hog troughs" and frame for rust. As you probably know these are the areas of the Avanti that are prone to deteriation and it's better to evaluate and repair before others fixes on the list as a complete repair could entail removing the body from the frame or cutting the rocker panels lose and then glassing them back in if the hog troughs need replacing.

The car came from somewhere down south.  The bottoms of the rear frame horns are perferated but the frame on the whole looks good.  The hog troughs look good enough that I probably wont have to do work there.  I pulled the body on my lotus a few years back which is a little trick because the "frame" is basically just two subframes linked with a sheetmetal box to prevent flex.  The fibreglass body is a big structural component on those cars.  First priority is the brakes, then the rear end, then the cooling system ( so I can move it) then I'll check it out the frame before moving on.

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6 hours ago, 64studeavanti said:

Also check the windshield frame and a pillars, especially under the windshield reveal molding on the sides of the windshield. Quite often these items are completely rusted away. They can be replaced, but at a substantial cost.

I'll certainly chevk thst out.

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On 7/20/2021 at 6:53 PM, 1inxs said:

Congratulations! Looks very close to being a driver now.  What a great project, post back with progress.

I agree. Looks like a solid car. Before you go all out and paint it, try giving it a good polishing. My 63 (sold) sat in a garage for 35 years. Here is what it looked like before and after a wet sanding and polish. It took a 3rd place in one of the classes (forgot which one) at the LaPalma Studebaker Show in Anaheim, CA a few years back too. Amazing what some "elbow grease" and patience will produce. I enjoyed it as a driver and it had that worn original look. Keep us posted!   

63 avanti 005.jpg

IMG_9655.JPG

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Posted (edited)

That is one great looking car.  I unfortunately I will need to be painting mine.  I have been known to paint cars.  Notice the spray booth which you might have mistaken for an operating theater because it's so clean.

IMAG2057.jpg

Edited by KWOL
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Just now, KWOL said:

That is one great looking car.  I unfortunately I will need to be painting it.  I have been known to paint cars.  Notice the spray booth which you might have mistaken for an operating theater because it's so clean.

IMAG2057.jpg

I also sometimes don't paint cars.

IMG_20200801_170227.jpg

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9 hours ago, KWOL said:

The car came from somewhere down south.  The bottoms of the rear frame horns are perferated but the frame on the whole looks good.  The hog troughs look good enough that I probably wont have to do work there.  I pulled the body on my lotus a few years back which is a little trick because the "frame" is basically just two subframes linked with a sheetmetal box to prevent flex.  The fibreglass body is a big structural component on those cars.  First priority is the brakes, then the rear end, then the cooling system ( so I can move it) then I'll check it out the frame before moving on.

 

IMG_0519.JPG

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That was the lotus frame off I did a few years ago  it.  It's actually worse getting parts for those with three digit production figures.

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Looks a lot like my hi-tech spray booth. Your plan to go forward is solid but when you get the car in the air to replace the bottom plate (basically 4"X 1/8" plate steel) give the hog troughs a very close look.  If they need some metal but are good nick generally, it's basically just sheet metal work.

 

 

spray booth.jpg

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11 hours ago, Paul K. said:

I agree. Looks like a solid car. Before you go all out and paint it, try giving it a good polishing. My 63 (sold) sat in a garage for 35 years. Here is what it looked like before and after a wet sanding and polish. It took a 3rd place in one of the classes (forgot which one) at the LaPalma Studebaker Show in Anaheim, CA a few years back too. Amazing what some "elbow grease" and patience will produce. I enjoyed it as a driver and it had that worn original look. Keep us posted!   

63 avanti 005.jpg

IMG_9655.JPG

Paul, That looks fantastic! Although I too have been painting cars for over 45 years, I jump at the chance to save original paint. Yours and my 1964 Avanti original paint have to be in the double digits as far as survivors in full originality. 

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10 hours ago, Avanti83 said:

Looks a lot like my hi-tech spray booth. Your plan to go forward is solid but when you get the car in the air to replace the bottom plate (basically 4"X 1/8" plate steel) give the hog troughs a very close look.  If they need some metal but are good nick generally, it's basically just sheet metal work.

 

 

spray booth.jpg

Nice paint job.  The shop looks pretty nice.  I just moved and I haven't built a barn yet so who knows where I'll be painting it yet.  

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6 hours ago, 1inxs said:

No sand and buff yet, just wash and wax. It’s been under a car cover since 1969.

E18F2545-D99B-4B2F-A2BB-DFDCEBD45FF8.jpeg

Couldn't find a drooling emoji so just imagine I' m drooling.

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3 minutes ago, KWOL said:

Couldn't find a drooling emoji so just imagine I' m drooling.

Lol! Yeah, You would think there would be a drooling emoji on a car site.

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My son and I bought this Avanti about 4 years ago.  The original purchaser had it until he died in about 2017.  He thought so much about his Avanti and Golden Hawk that they were mentioned in his obituary.  Original, paint, carpets, seats, and engine, save for some hoses and filters etc.  We finally get to enjoy it together this August as he's been in India and London for the past 7 years.  Bozeman , Montana will celebrate Cruiz'n on Main Street with about 6 blocks in downtown blocked off for showing old cars.  

[img]https://i.imgur.com/FXmuW9M.png[/img]

[img]https://i.imgur.com/Z36yoDA.png[/img]

[img]https://i.imgur.com/drXZyD2.jpg[/img]

[img]https://i.imgur.com/GqV2yjN.png[/img]

 

Maybe a better way to post pictures.

 

 

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Edited by Stormy
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25 minutes ago, Stormy said:

Paul K and others, can you describe the materials and process in wet sanding ?

2000 grit wet sandpaper, trigger spray bottle with clean water. One panel at a time using tri-fold sandpaper and an open hand thoroughly sanding  lightly until the entire surface has been sanded. Rotate sandpaper and keep the surface and paper clean throughout the process. Follow up with a good compound using an orbital polisher and proper polishing pads. Stay away from your edges. This is the short version. I would recommend visiting your local detail supplier for products, tips and further guidance. Ask lots of questions and don’t proceed until / unless you are comfortable with the process. I would also recommend you  do a trial run on an old used body panel to perfect your technique before you attempt the process on the Avanti.

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10 hours ago, 1inxs said:

2000 grit wet sandpaper, trigger spray bottle with clean water. One panel at a time using tri-fold sandpaper and an open hand thoroughly sanding  lightly until the entire surface has been sanded. Rotate sandpaper and keep the surface and paper clean throughout the process. Follow up with a good compound using an orbital polisher and proper polishing pads. Stay away from your edges. This is the short version. I would recommend visiting your local detail supplier for products, tips and further guidance. Ask lots of questions and don’t proceed until / unless you are comfortable with the process. I would also recommend you  do a trial run on an old used body panel to perfect your technique before you attempt the process on the Avanti.

Go to youtube, you are looking at cutting and buffing more than wet sanding. 1inxs is correct in you will need to be comfortable with the process, otherwise the cost of the equipment, polishing compounds and supplies will go a long way toward paying to have it done professionally. It's pretty easy to buff through the paint if you hit an edge or sharp contour line.

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Best of luck with your new project.  I'm a couple months into mine (a lot rougher than yours!) and enjoying most of the process.

About the hog troughs from down south:  Just because an Avanti spent its life away from salted roads and a lot of moisture doesn't mean you are in the clear.  There are weep holes that let water escape from various points (like the cowl vent) and lead the water down into the hog troughs where  (in theory) it could easily escape.  In the dry dusty southern regions, where they get a lot of wind blown dust, this dust can get washed down into the hog troughs where it collects and then holds moisture.  That constant moisture can easily rust the hog troughs out from the inside.  When you get the car up on a lift first check for visible signs of rust, and then hammer test (lightly) the bottom of the troughs for weak spots.

My right side troughs was "toast" but the left side looked solid.  I figured "what the hell" and decided to rip them both out and replace them.  The left side was badly rusted and needed replacing almost as badly as the right side, even though it wasn't "rust through" except in two very small spots.  The job is a real "PAIN" but I feel much better knowing I'm working now from a solid base.

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