Jump to content

Ross steering box reference


Vaaraz
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello,

I own an 1963 Avanti R2 in France.
Sorry if my question seems very candid to you but, while I am looking into a problem on my steering box, I wonder if it is an original assembly or a later adaptation.

Those who can go look or who already know, could you please tell me what type of steering box you have ?
On mine is indicated : ROSS SE 542999.

It is not very accessible and I thank you in advance!

Daniel

Capture d’écran 2022-01-07 à 00.08.38.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for your answer,

The steering is very imprecise around the middle point and I'm looking for someone (in France) who can redo the worm or reload it with metal.
First of all, I already wanted to make sure I had the original steering box.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

The middle point can be adjusted using the screw on the side of the box with the locknut.  You have to follow the guidelines tho, as the worm shaft spiral gets thinner at that point and too tight there can lead to binding on turns. 

The chances that you have a different box that other Avantis is fairly slim.  I don't have any specific identifying info on hand other than pics of other cars, but looking for them would take a while.  No other Studebakers except the Avantis, used the Ross box with the fabric connector joint.     The rebuild parts (Seals, bushings, sector pin kit, etc,  are  are available from Studebaker International.  The worm shaft may be an issue, but it's likely available somewhere.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have an 1969 Avanti II with a Ross box 542989. So one 989 instead of 999.

Leaks like hell thru the top seal. I do not know how the oil can go upwards. I seams to fly out the box somehow. Hate it!

IMG_0405.thumb.jpeg.fc6c743f1ee74ac76ce3912530249c3e.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Kodjo said:

I have an 1969 Avanti II with a Ross box 542989. So one 989 instead of 999.

Leaks like hell thru the top seal. I do not know how the oil can go upwards. I seams to fly out the box somehow. Hate it!

IMG_0405.thumb.jpeg.fc6c743f1ee74ac76ce3912530249c3e.jpeg

https://studebaker-info.org/Tech/Steer/rosstopseal/rosstopseal.html

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Vaaraz. Im restoring my 63 Avanti just now and opened the steering wheel last week. Taking the flange apart. If you need measurements, I'll be happy to help.

IMG_2972.JPG

IMG_2971.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Kodjo said:

I have an 1969 Avanti II with a Ross box 542989. So one 989 instead of 999.

Leaks like hell thru the top seal. I do not know how the oil can go upwards. I seams to fly out the box somehow. Hate it!

IMG_0405.thumb.jpeg.fc6c743f1ee74ac76ce3912530249c3e.jpeg

Hi Kodjo. As you see from the photo. The Steering Cam behaves like pump and press the oil up or down depending on which direction you turn. Turn to right and oil goes up. This is not the meaning but happens because of "screwcam"

Edited by Leo B
Added text.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Leo B said:

Hi Kodjo. As you see from the photo. The Steering Cam behaves like pump and press the oil up or down depending on which direction you turn. Turn to right and oil goes up. This is not the meaning but happens because of "screwcam"

That was my assumption two. As on the picture, I did not get the rag joint of. So, I could not replace the sealing. I regret this now...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you Silverstud,

Yes, I had confirmation that my steering box is original.
I just misread the reference which is: SE 542989.
The adjustment is already at the maximum and I know that the endless screw is not available... I believe that the only solution is to "reload" it with metal.
I am looking for a workshop that can do this in my area...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you Leo B!

This photo of the interior is precious to me because my car is in a workshop more than 100 km from my home and I am looking for a workshop that could recharge or redo the worm.
Thank you very much for your offer of help.

Daniel

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Daniel! Am I right you need a cone / steering cam lever shaft studs which works with cam? IMG_2978.jpg

https://www.parts123.com/parts123/dyndetail.pta?catalog=0001003a&uKeY=AARLF

In image IMG_2973 you see adjusting screw. A new one is easy to do with lathe machine by professional. Adjusting screw is about 30mm long and should not screwed tight, just gentle tightening against the axle without space and so that steering turn easily. If used correctly it will last a very long time. Too tight makes steering hard to turn and spoils steering cam and the cone stud.

You find an new seal from Ebay https://www.ebay.com/itm/144193190140

Like in Silverstudes comment:

https://studebaker-info.org/Tech/Steer/rosstopseal/rosstopseal.html

I used 3/4 socket when I removed the seal.

BR Leo

IMG_2980.JPG

IMG_2979.JPG

IMG_2978.JPG

IMG_2973.JPG

Edited by Leo B
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, DaytonaR2 said:

I found a replacement seal for the top seal at an agriculture hydraulic business.  Worked perfectly.  I bought a couple 

Do you recall the application it was listed for? / thx

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, Vaaraz said:

Thank you Silverstud,

Yes, I had confirmation that my steering box is original.
I just misread the reference which is: SE 542989.
The adjustment is already at the maximum and I know that the endless screw is not available... I believe that the only solution is to "reload" it with metal.
I am looking for a workshop that can do this in my area...

Hi, If you need new adjusting screw and If authenticity is not a must, this modern one should work. Still Im very sure the screw can be done by machine in France. Dont think about adding metal or something like that.
Please check.
This one has a spring and keeps correct "contact". Read more.

https://siminoffjeeparts.com/products/tightsteer-model-200-x
Edited by Leo B
Added the link.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Leo,

I actually found this piece on Bob Johnstone's website, but I feel like it's just a stopgap.
Also, I agree, the repair by metal refill does not seem a very durable solution as well to me. 
I found a workshop in France which can redo the endless screw... remains the question of the price...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/24/2022 at 7:17 PM, silverstude said:

They show the part #?

DaytonaR2 is right. You find correct seal from hydraulic parts shop (go lively). There is a seal (with lip) for this like 30 x 22 mm or bigger 32 x 22mm. I didnt get 30 x 22mm which they have in their catalogue. I got better idea... I bought 32 x 22mm and I will took about 2mm off from aluminium part with lathe machine and then it will be 100% perfect size.
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, Vaaraz said:

Thanks Leo,

I actually found this piece on Bob Johnstone's website, but I feel like it's just a stopgap.
Also, I agree, the repair by metal refill does not seem a very durable solution as well to me. 
I found a workshop in France which can redo the endless screw... remains the question of the price...

Why is Tightsteer a good idea? Most often you use the cam in the middle area. This means that more metal is consumed from same area. But you can’t adjust the screw to the needs of the middle area (if it’s very worn) because then the end and top are too tight and it’s even dangerous. The Tightsteer (it has a pressure spring) on the cam lever stud has the same contact and pressure in all areas.

All these are my own conclusions. I will buy Tightsteer but I will not receive a discount on this advert.🤣

Edited by Leo B
Writing too fast :-)))
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, Vaaraz said:

Thanks Leo,

I did not understand the exact functioning of Tightsteer, your details are very interesting. I'm thinking about it.

Does this help?f

 

Edited by Leo B
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...