Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Thanks for your info...that's a beast!!

The Evans coolant and switching out to a six blade fan has helped some, but I gotta take the next step with a radiator change out and electric fan(s). Anyone know where Studebaker did high temp testing? (tongue firmly in cheek)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Some years ago I purchased near the last NOS Stude Avanti radiator from what was then Avanti Motors....I installed it into my '63.

I don't know if having it is a blessing or a curse!.....it cools well, however if it were ever damaged I'm not sure there's even one auto radiator repair shop left in my area that hasn't closed its doors......Long story short, it's getting quite hard to get a brass radiator repaired!......Going forward, I'd go with aluminum.:)

Link to post
Share on other sites

You can try Tough Guy Enterprises, Inc. 64080 US Highway 31, Lakeville, IN 46536 (574) 233-6488.  The family has started  doing radiator repairs before the Studebaker factory closed.  The have worked on 2 of my Avanti's and have a stash of parts.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

One thing leads to another on the engine cooling project.

I installed a four inch aluminum radiator with a 3200cfm electric fan. Works great in town, but on the freeway as more air enters into the engine compartment and boosted by the electric fan, the water temp rises to an unsafe level. Pull the car off the highway and things start to cool down. And it really cools down when the hood is popped open, using the inside release.

I don't want to damage the hood by having it bounce around by being partially open. But has anyone had luck getting the hot air out of an Avanti engine compartment? Putting vent grilles in the hood near the front cowl would probably work, but definitely would change the appearance of the car. I've drilled the six holes into the wheel wells, but that's nowhere near the opening size needed to disperse air from a 3200cfm fan and what comes in from the road at highway speeds.

I've even thought of reversing the fan direction, and push air out the tiny grille. Aside from moving to cooler climes, any thoughts?

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

If the high temps are occurring at highway speeds you should look at the lower radiator hose.  If it's collapsing under vacuum which occurs at highway speeds it cuts off or at least reduces coolant flow.  It should have a coil spring inside it to keep the hose from collapsing.  The spring could be rusted away.  

Also...consider getting an air deflector from a Saturn and install it under the radiator support...it keeps air turbulence from forming under the car by directing it around.  I had one under the '70 I owned and it made a distinct difference in cooling at highway speeds.  Saturns aren't made any more so the part may be unavailable.  I don't have the GM part number anymore but maybe someone else does...if so try asking for that part number at a GM dealer and see if any are still in someone's parts inventory. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Gunslinger said:

 

Also...consider getting an air deflector from a Saturn and install it under the radiator support...it keeps air turbulence from forming under the car by directing it around.  I had one under the '70 I owned and it made a distinct difference in cooling at highway speeds.  Saturns aren't made any more so the part may be unavailable.  I don't have the GM part number anymore but maybe someone else does...if so try asking for that part number at a GM dealer and see if any are still in someone's parts inventory. 

Below the radiator air deflectors are a good idea for Avantis driven in warm weather...however, there's really no need to 'beat the bushes' searching for a Saturn air deflector.

I made one for my '83 Avanti 'everyday driver' by shaping a piece of 1/4" plastic laminate  with my jigsaw until I achieved the desired shape.....I then sanded it and painted it my Avanti's exterior body color..... then crafted three simple 'L' brackets out of aluminum flat stock.............It looks great, and definitely does the job!:)

Link to post
Share on other sites

My first thought was holes in the inner fender, but you already did that.  The lower air deflector is a good idea.  I suggest going with a less powerful (less air movement) electric fan.   Is your fan thermostatically operated or does it just run?  Do you have a manual switch on the fan to see if shutting it off makes a difference?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, studegary said:

My first thought was holes in the inner fender, but you already did that.  The lower air deflector is a good idea.  I suggest going with a less powerful (less air movement) electric fan.   Is your fan thermostatically operated or does it just run?  Do you have a manual switch on the fan to see if shutting it off makes a difference?

I've heard good things re: the air dam and may give it a shot.  My fan is thermostatically controlled, but I don't want to shut it off...especially in the Valley's 115 degree heat! Because the Avanti's radiator is mounted at an angle and the electric fan is a puller, a tremendous force of hot air is pushed upward in the engine compartment. That's why the engine compartment cools down when the hood is partially opened. A grille in the hood near the forward cowl would probably work wonders for air circulation. Unfortunately it radically changes the appearance of the vehicle, and I'm sure I'd hear about it!  😱

Edited by Desert Driver
Link to post
Share on other sites

A downside to allowing the hood to remain unlatched is that the hot air being allowed out can easily go down the intakes to the interior and transmission cooling ducts at the base of the windshield.  Besides adding to the already known hot interior of the car and even more heated air to the transmission tunnel do you really want to be breathing in engine bay air?  

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Gunslinger said:

A downside to allowing the hood to remain unlatched is that the hot air being allowed out can easily go down the intakes to the interior and transmission cooling ducts at the base of the windshield.  Besides adding to the already known hot interior of the car and even more heated air to the transmission tunnel do you really want to be breathing in engine bay air?  

Good point...(cough, cough). I plugged those two holes that take air to the transmission shifter. IMHO that was a bandaid solution for a problem that remains today. I've also plugged the footwell vents to prevent outside air getting into the cabin. In Arizona, we don't need outside air competing with a marginal AC system such as mine. For outside air, I crack the wing vents and kick open the rear windows. Works great, and zero fumes from my engine.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Have we answered the question of cooling the engine with the hood unlatched at speed or are we assuming that because it cools when at idle with the hood open it cools down. At idle it's not generating the heat it was at speed. 

If it cools with the hood unlatched them it is worth trying to get the air out of the engine compartment. Otherwise don't discount Gunslingers lower hose thought as well as the need for a good shroud enclosing the electric fan. Do you also have a coolant recovery system on the car to assure that the system is liquid full and not containing air.

The air dam usually helps also but I think a bit more info may help get you running cooler. 

I thought about NACA ducts in the hood of my 74 hood but I've had good luck with the 83 in Michigan so it was just more work than I wanted. If you ever get interested, late model Mustangs have some nice close-able hood ducts. BTW the NACA ducts are usually just behind the radiator so they may vent into the high speed stream that goes over the car. Just a thought.

Personally, IIWM, I'd find a way to pad and fasten the hood open and drive it at speeds known to cause problems and see if it really does cool properly. Then I could work on a venting strategy.

Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Footer said:

Try putting some type of rubber hose as a spacer and adjust the hood latches up. And let us know. Mike

That's probably the quickest and least expensive remedy. The air from the electric fan blows up, so allowing it to escape under the back of the hood makes a lot of sense. Just want to make sure I don't crack the fiberglass with that thing flopping around!

I run with Evans coolant, which does a pretty good job of lowering temps. Biggest problem is living in the desert with a car that really wasn't designed for the desert. But I do recall pictures of the Avanti at Loewy's home in Palm Springs. Bet those pictures weren't taken in the summer 🥵

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
On 8/20/2020 at 3:52 PM, Desert Driver said:

That's probably the quickest and least expensive remedy. The air from the electric fan blows up, so allowing it to escape under the back of the hood makes a lot of sense. Just want to make sure I don't crack the fiberglass with that thing flopping around!

I run with Evans coolant, which does a pretty good job of lowering temps. Biggest problem is living in the desert with a car that really wasn't designed for the desert. But I do recall pictures of the Avanti at Loewy's home in Palm Springs. Bet those pictures weren't taken in the summer 🥵

 

Several years ago, to alleviate some of the underhood heat, I installed large 'grills' in the vertical sections of the L&R fiberglass inner skirts of my '83 Avanti 'everyday driver'.

They are plastic, and look kind of like the passenger compartment floor vent grills found on '64-'85 Avantis. (approx same size & shape).......They seem to help a bit more than that series of holes the factory drilled on some Avanti ll's,........and these grills are much closer to exhaust manifold heat.......Ed:)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...