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Avanti wheel lugs


floyd jaehnert
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I thought they all had the same thread.

I heard some differentials had left and right threads as the wheel nuts would loosen on one side but I don't think that applies to anything supplied on the Avanti.

pb

 

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Of course my 64 R2 has all right hand threads. My 1964 Plymouth Fury still retained a left hand thread. I believe Chrysler Corp was the last company with those threads.

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1 hour ago, avantifred said:

Of course my 64 R2 has all right hand threads. My 1964 Plymouth Fury still retained a left hand thread. I believe Chrysler Corp was the last company with those threads.

That brings back memories.  My father and I each purchased new 1964 Fury hardtops.  His was a 318 and mine was a hipo 383.  

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14 hours ago, Stormy said:

My 63 Avanti has a lug on the rear that just spins, so a nut cannot be installed.  How does one fix this ?

You remove the drum with a HUB puller after loosening/removing  the large axle nut and reversing it on the axle, spinning it so the castling is inward and the flat end is even with the threaded end ( this will prevent the axle from spreading).  The hub puller will tightly mount on three lugs.  The puller threaded center pin is mounted so the point is in the center of the axle.  You tighten the threaded pin as much as you can, into the axle .... and I mean TIGHT.  Assure that the threaded pin and the axle are on the same plane, so the shock travels straight thru the axle.   Then,  using a 3 or 5 lb sledge, smack the head of the threaded pin.  Maybe tighten more/ smack more.  You might have to leave it an hour or two and try again.  Using heat may help but is somewhat dangerous around fiberglass, brake fluids, etc.  The hub is tightened to the axle using an interference fit, at 170Ft/lbs of torque when assembled. To ease this removal, some say to loosen the axle nut a turn and then drive the car around the block.  It may work, but???  I've only used the shop manual method above.

The outer axle has an axle/hub has a woodruff key that you can see when you remove the axle nut and washer.  Remember the orientation of the key...small end goes in.  Also of great importance is that you use NO lubricant on any part of the axle or hub. Clean them if necessary with a good Brake Cleaner, dry them well, dry them well, dry them well.  Any oil can make the assembly easier, but will result in splitting the hub.

 The lugs themselves are fitted into the hub from the rear and pass through the drum, the the lug is swedged onto the drum, which means there's a small amount of lug material pinched to fix the lug in position.  You can use a file to grind away the outermost bit and that will defeat most of the swedge.  Then take a ball peen hammer and smack the bad lug to push it back thru the drum and hub.  Take it to a Parts store and see if they can replicate it.  In fact take everything as they may be able to refit the lug and swedge it on.  The threads are 1/2" by 20, I don't know the length of the original lugs.  If you find the new lug, without any help, then insert the lug in the rear of the drum thru the hub, Use the ball peen hammer with a piece of wood to buffer the blow and rap it unto its completely seated.  Alternatively use the lug nut with a washer  against the drum to pull it through.  On the outer side where the lug threads protrude, you may use a sharp center punch to jam some drum material against the lug to emulate a swedge or just leave the lug alone, as the other four are doing the same job and the new one can just go along for the ride.

Not a difficult job and it will get you familiar with what's required to do a brake job..

Edited by silverstude
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  • 1 month later...

Stormy,

Did you ever find a hub puller?

I purchased a SnapOn hub puller last month to pull the hub/drum units off of a spare rear end I had. It pulls on four of the lug bolts.

You are welcome to borrow it if you need to. I also have 13 NOS rear lugs if you need a couple.

Mike

 

 

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Mike, that is so generous of you.  Thank you.  I will have to wait until my son gets here before I try to do the work.  He's in India for several months, but hopefully will be here in the fall.  Is it possible to send me your contact info ?  I am at darylh1942@gmail.com.  406-282-7164

Again, thank you for your thoughtfulness.  Daryl

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  • 1 month later...

Daryl, 

When you knock those studs out, be very careful to support the flange directly, use a socket that is just a bit larger than the head of the stud.  The vertical wall of the drum is very thin and you can warp the drum.  One way to reduce the swage and help reduce pressure to push out the stud is get a 5/8" hole saw (thank Phil Harris for this), remove the centering drill and just kiss the shoulder of the bolt deeply enough to barely touch the drum.  The stud should then tap out.  If you really want to go all out, replace the tapered axles Phil has with flanged axles.

Ken

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13 hours ago, Stormy said:

Kennie, thanks for the good warning.  

Any thoughts on just tack welding the spinning stud ? 

Daryl

Don't go there Daryl.  Unless you want to really hate life...then weld away.  Tack weld a spinning stud is the sort of kluge you would do in an emergency.  If the stud is spinning in its hole ( I misread your first statement and thought the thread stripped) I would be concerned that the hub itself may be cracked.  It's not an uncommon type of failure, it is the Achilles heel of that axle.  I just converted my axles over to flanged type and have 2 good hubs I could sell.  Get the proper puller that pulls on the studs (not the drum itself) and examine your's closely.

Ken

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I had to replace a couple of studs on my car. They were splined shaft studs. It sounds like your stud is spinning where the press in splines on the shaft should be gripping the hub. If this is the case hope that it is the splines that are worn and the new stud will still press into the hub. If your studs are not the splined type then replacing with the splined type shouldn't be a problem.

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