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murph the surf

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Posts posted by murph the surf

  1. In John Hull's book "Studebaker Avanti Operation Airlift", the plane pictured that accompanied the Fairchild C82 carrying the two Avantis,and that was used to shuttle Studebaker executives from city to city during " Operation Airlift" was indeed the Lodestar. The differing passenger capacity of the planes would have undoubtedly dictated usage.

  2. 11 hours ago, Desert Driver said:

    Dunno. In John Hull's "Avanti Operation Airlift", Sherwood Egbert had Board permission to purchase a Beech Queen Air at a cost not to exceed $185,000. The Queen Air from that era looks more like the photo above than the Howard 250. 

    Yes, the window configuration in the picture looks similar to that of a Queen Air...

  3. The corporate aircraft used by Studebaker Corporation executives during the Avanti era was a:

    1)  Douglas DC3  2)  Boeing 247  3) Convair CV240  4) Douglas DC6  5) Howard 250 Lodestar   6) De Havilland DH 114 Heron

    egbertplane.jpg

  4. In search of a model to replace the aging line of Studebaker passenger cars (other than the Avanti) beginning in the 1964 model year, Studebaker considered several options, one option being an Avanti-influenced, Avanti-based full model lineup. The man sent to France, to oversee the construction of the fully functional metal bodied prototype for the Avanti-based lineup was:

    1) Otto Klausmeyer 2) Otis Romine 3) John Ebstein 4) Brooks Stevens

    pichonandparat.jpg

  5. John Ebstein, one of 4 members as well as the nominal project manager of the team who finalized the design for the Avanti in 1961, was invaluable to Raymond Loewy on the Avanti Design project, as well as other Loewy projects, and was hired by Raymond Loewy because of his:   1)  "creative sensibility"   2)  ability to beat a deadline  3)  unique skill on collaborating with a product's engineers  4)  airbrushing skills

    avantidesign.jpg

  6. 5 hours ago, murph the surf said:

    This is indeed R4130. The "all custom" that Mr. Egbert references in his ad refers to the many hand-fabricated, non production items installed on the car by Studebaker Engineering that were unique to this car, which, as we know,was was a "test mule" car for running changes to be introduced on the '64 models. Most of these items were hand-made by Engineering, and were somewhat different than the items as they subsequently appeared on the '64 models. The "built by Granatelli" references the performance modifications that were done to 4130 by Granatelli after it served it had served its duty as the "prototype"-for the interior and exterior engineering testing- at that point, the car was sent to Granatelli's shop in Santa Monica, and an R3 engine was installed, along with a unique supercharger cooling unit, as well as a set of Halibrands. Many engine accessories were chromed as well. The "custom interior" undoubtedly references the non-production styled thick back bucket seats, pre-production tilt wheel, pre-production solid color interior, wood grain trim metal-grated interior air vents, ('64's had plastic grating)  '64 style (but hand-made) rear window latches, door handles,etc etc. Quite probably as a "test mule", the finish of the car took its lumps, and George Barris's shop in Los Angeles was a logical and local choice for new paint.

     

     

     

  7. 2 hours ago, mfg said:

    Murph, not to question this, but I'm wondering if this could possibly be another '64 Avanti owned (or used) by Mr. Egbert..and not R4130?:huh:

    If it is R4130 , someone went to A LOT of trouble to bring the car back to original (Paxton) condition!:o

    I recall that a man named Norris owned the car back in the mid '80's.

    This is indeed R4130. The "all custom" that Mr. Egbert references in his ad refers to the many hand-fabricated, non production items installed on the car by Studebaker Engineering that were unique to this car, which, as we know,was was a "test mule" car for running changes to be introduced on the '64 models. Most of these items were hand-made by Engineering, and were somewhat different than the items as they subsequently appeared on the '64 models. The "built by Granatelli" references the performance modifications that were done to 4130 by Granatelli after it served it had served its duty as the "prototype"-for the interior and exterior engineering testing- at that point, the car was sent to Granatelli's shop in Santa Monica, and an R3 engine was installed, along with a unique supercharger cooling unit, as well as a set of Halibrands. Many engine accessories were chromed as well. The "custom interior" undoubtedly references the non-production styled thick back bucket seats, pre-production tilt wheel, pre-production solid color interior, wood grain trim metal-grated interior air vents, ('64's had plastic grating)  '64 style (but hand-made) rear window latches, door handles,etc etc. Quite probably as a "test mule", the finish of the car took its lumps, and George Barris's shop in Los Angeles was a logical choice for new paint.

     

     

  8. 5 minutes ago, mfg said:

    WOW!...that is one HISTORIC ad!!.....I can only guess at the asking price, and my guess is........$2500:)

    Certainly a logical guess for the price of a 5 year old Avanti at the time, but,not the correct answer..

  9. R4130, the Granatelli R3 powered Avanti that was Sherwood Egbert’s personal car, was listed for sale by him just prior to his passing. The car was priced by Mr. Egbert at:  1) $5000   2) $4750   3) $4250  4) $3900  5) $3000   6) $2500

     

    12E8ADC5-99AF-4A76-95FC-7ACA5461467A.jpeg

  10. 4 hours ago, wapanzica said:

    That would be The Kirkeby Center Building.  I also think it is now called Occidental Petroleum Center.

    Bingo- that is where Mr. Egbert's office was..Arnold Kirkeby, who built the Kirkeby Center, also owned a home located in Bel Air named Chartwell. Chartwell is the "mansion" you see in the opening credits of the Beverly Hillbillies television show.

    kirkeby.jpg

  11. After his departure from Studebaker, Sherwood Egbert returned to Los Angeles, and opened a corporate development and industrial management consulting firm. His office was located in which of the following office buildings in Los Angeles?  A) The Capitol Records Building  B) The Bradbury Building  C) The Eastern Columbia Building D) The Kirkeby Center Building.

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