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1963 turquoise paint code needed


dixchief
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I have these numbers and the links but they don't lead to a current formula. I also have a Ditzler # 12525. I thought Ditzler became Dupont but the reply says it became PPG. I may have to go to the PPG shop although I prefer to not do business there due to their attitude.

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Ditzler paints was absorbed/purchased/renamed by PPG. Nowadays, many paint suppliers have cameras that can automatically formulate a paint mix formula if you have a sample,( a part of your Avanti with paint in good shape), that they can photograph.......Quite interesting!

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Ditzler paints was absorbed/purchased/renamed by PPG. Nowadays, many paint suppliers have cameras that can automatically formulate a paint mix formula if you have a sample,( a part of your Avanti with paint in good shape), that they can photograph.......Quite interesting!

be careful with cameras. cameras can only identify the colors that are in their data base, which is most MODERN car colors. they can't "come close". having to match many Indian MC colors (1914-1950's), I found bring the sample to the color book is always best. But I think a 1963 color code should be available.

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be careful with cameras. cameras can only identify the colors that are in their data base, which is most MODERN car colors. they can't "come close". having to match many Indian MC colors (1914-1950's), I found bring the sample to the color book is always best. But I think a 1963 color code should be available.

If it's of any help to you, I can supply you with the original tint colors, and amounts of each tint, for the automotive color 'Studebaker Avanti Turquoise'. However, this would be to formulate lacquer paint. (Which I personally prefer for a couple of reasons)

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Where would one even get the same toners as listed in the formulas? numbers change over the years, and complete lines of toners are eliminated from production.

Lacquer is illegal to spray in many larger metropolitan areas. I have to be EPA certified for tracking waste. It's even illegal to posses a non HVLP paint gun in regulated shops. It's a 5O thousand dollar fine.

An individual CAN however use it for hobby reasons. Bill Hirsch is the only one I know selling lacquer.

Although lacquer looks nice it cant compare to modern urethane formulations in terms of durability. I'm not talking about garage queens, but cars that see major air pollution, and 5OOO ft plus ultra-violet radiation. Plus you don't have to worry about bird droppings, and brake fluid spills. Even todays gasoline with all the alcohol will ruin lacquer in short order. There are NO arguments for using lacquer that make any sense. Base clear is easier to blend, and if you get a run in clear, it buffs out much better. Metallic dispersion is controlable and it doesn't change when you cut and buff it. [wet sand] .I have been spraying paint since lacquer was common, and as materials advanced I embraced them, learned them, found them to work well, and never looked back. All the compounds, and techniques are formulated for modern materials in paint shops and one would have to go out of your way to use outdated materials.

If one thinks they need a single stage paint to match the "original look" then there are urethane single stage paints also sold. But then you have some of the same metallic and blending problems of the original too.

This is what works for me and every competent painter that I know. Your results may vary.

Edited by brad
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brad, I completely agree on the negatves you mention concerning lacquer paint.....But why is it still sought out and purchased by very selective paint shops and/or their customers?....Because under critical lighting, say in a large auditorium, NOTHING but NOTHING compares to the look of lacquer.....For durability, it's the wrong paint to use....But for outstanding 'show car' appearance...it really has no equal!!

(now brad, don't argue with me about this unless your willing to be called a 'DRAMA QUEEN'....er....'KING'!!!!!!)

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If it's of any help to you, I can supply you with the original tint colors, and amounts of each tint, for the automotive color 'Studebaker Avanti Turquoise'. However, this would be to formulate lacquer paint. (Which I personally prefer for a couple of reasons)

thank you mfg. I will keep that in mind. I do prefer the newer single stage paints and the toners for these are different.

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I completely concur with Brad. I have heard some say that the base coat/clear coat finishes "don't look right" but single stage is a one shot attempt. If you have a need to color sand & buff afterwards you stand a good chance of cutting through & seeing metallic "bulls eyes". This applies to lacquer paint too. Back in the late 60's/early 70's Chrysler used a larger flake in their metallic so before we were compensated for 2 stage we had to use a clear to prevent those types of re-dos.

The last car I painted with lacquer ended up checking less than 2 years later. That was in 1989. By then the formulas & what was sold was inferior in the major suppliers attempts to meet emissions standards. No I didn't apply it too thick. 3 quarts were used for the complete paint on my 66 Daytona Sports Sedan. Since then it's only urethane enamel for me. I don't need the practice of redo's.

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Modern paints are really the 'way to go'.......but lacquer..APPLIED PROPERLY and FINISHED PROPERLY really can't be beat in the world of show cars. (IMHO) Believe me, the pros don't use single or two stage urethanes on Duesenbergs!!

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I'd just ad to my above comment that I refinished my own '63 Studebaker Avanti, (63R1379), in 1991, after completely removing all earlier paint jobs. I used the Dupont version of 'Avanti Turqouoise Lacquer'.

To this day, 24 years later, there is no sign of the cracking and checking that Warren mentions above....and to this day I constantly get positive comments about how beautiful this lacquer paint job looks!

Two things though......This Avanti is always garaged, and really never sees any weather, and, there unfortunately are stress cracks now showing here and there arising from the fiberglass itself. But, once again, the lacquer paint has held up beautifully.

I also refinished my '55 President Speedster in black lacquer about 18 years ago....once again....it's tough to beat the look of properly rubbed out black lacquer paint under flourescent lighting!!

Edited by mfg
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used all the codes I could find on the list but my Dupont and SW dealers couldn't find any matches. Any leads on a current code?

TIA

Richard

Are you attempting a spot refinish, panel refinish or overall refinish. No modern non-acrylic lacquer, will match regardless of formula. The carriers in modern paint are different and even the same base coat applied with a different brand clear will not look "right" and appear different from each other. If you are just spot painting, a blendable acrylic lacquer should be available on-line.
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