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Jolly-John

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Posts posted by Jolly-John

  1. I don't get it, Dan. This is the same question you asked in another topic you started on February 28. Your initial topic is headlined: "Crooked steering wheel after new wheels and alignment" and is just a couple of topics down from this new one you just posted. Lots of guys gave you the benefit of their time and experience in replying to your first post. Your final post to this first topic was that you moved the steering wheel on the splined shaft, and the wheel was now straight. But now, you seem to be asking the original question all over again. Can you clarify what's going on? John

  2. Yes, Dan, most of us guys will suggest that you should get used to hearing that comment from your wife on a fairly regular basis!

    So, once you got the large nut off, could you tell if there was any factory index mark that would show the original (from the factory) position of the steering wheel on the shaft? If so, was the steering wheel and the shaft still indexed to that position? If no index mark, was your solution to simply relocate the position of the steering wheel a notch or two on the splined shaft, until the wheel was centered? Glad you're happy with the outcome. John

  3. Dan, it's wonderful that you're interested in your brother's Avanti, and want to start enjoying it. It sounds like you're a pretty persistent guy. You'll get to the bottom of this steering thing, for sure.

    Gary, with regard to your second paragraph: In my earlier comments, I meant that a prior owner or shop, might have moved the steering wheel on the splined shaft to center it (to compensate for all the front end wear-related issues Dan's shop eventually fixed). No telling what might have been done in the past!

    I sure agree with you that it's hard to do much but guess, when trying to help by long distance. John

  4. Hey, Guys....I believe all of us are assuming two things: First, perhaps the new tie rod ends aren't as "long" as the originals. Therefore, there would be less threaded shank available for the adjustment. Hopefully, Dan still has the original tie rod ends, and can compare their length to the ones the shop installed.

    Second assumption: That the steering wheel is currently properly indexed on the splined shaft, as observed when removing the center medallion on the steering wheel. It's been awhile since I had mine off, but I recall an indexing indication for the shaft and the wheel. Was it a cold chisel mark and a dot? I don't recall.  Anyway, I believe Dan should twist off the medallion and check that. If his front end was so crappy before, perhaps someone previously relocated the steering wheel on the shaft to get the steering wheel centered.  IF so, Dan can remove the steering wheel and rotate it back to the indexed position. Hopefully, that would yield a straight steering wheel positioning.  

    If this doesn't take care of the issue, I think the consensus of comments "to find another shop" makes great sense. However, if the new shop can't inexpensively solve the steering wheel centering problem, I think I could live with repositioning the steering wheel on the splined shaft. This won't cause any problems with the turning circle or centering of the gears in the steering box, since the position of the splined shaft (thus what's inside the steering box) doesn't change in the least. You've only changed the position of the wheel that turns the shaft. John

  5. I still go back to my posting above, in which I asked if Lew (or anyone else) has contacted SI to investigate and solve this obvious problem. After all, this a product THEY commissioned for reproduction and are selling exclusively. I know most all of us original Avanti owners are thrilled these sun visors are being reproduced. It's a much-needed item. However, this excitement and any "gratitude" shouldn't preclude purchasers from asking SI to rectify the problem. I realize SI gave a refund to one of the guys posting above, but that's not the same as them taking care of the production issue....which would benefit all future purchasers.

    If SI doesn't want to get to the bottom of this, perhaps they would consider selling these visors un-dyed, and include an instruction sheet covering proper surface preparation. I know they already offer the various interior dye colors in spray cans. So, that would be an add-on sale.  John

     

  6. Yes, Guys....my mistake. No star wheel adjuster on the Avanti rear brakes. I was thinking of the brake shoe configurations in the rear ends, used in some of the later Avanti II models. I apologize for misleading anyone.

    Back to Mike's issue for a minute. In some of the 1950's MOPAR cars we used to work on, we would measure the diameter across the surface of the new brake shoes. Then, we'd measure the inner diameter of the brake drum. We use this info to do a pre-adjustment on the brake shoes, before slipping the drum on. It might be helpful for Mike to try this, to see just how much he's off, as far as getting the drums over the new shoes.

    Also, ditto to Ed's comment about making sure the emergency brake cable is completely released. I should have remembered that. With the new fat shoes, the rear emergency brake cable adjusting yoke (#1110-16 behind the cable pivot on the frame) might have to be loosened up some. Perhaps a prior owner tighten it up to get the emergency brake to hold, as the rear brake shoes wore over the years. John

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  7. Don't laugh, since this sounds almost too simple to be the source of your difficulty....but can we assume you have turned the star wheel brake shoe adjuster between the bottom of the two brake shoes totally "closed"? This would mean no threads (or very few threads) are showing on the brake adjuster shaft by the star wheel? Many times, I've had to back the adjuster all the way off (resulting in no expansion at the bottom of the shoes), and then still had to "rock" the brake drum or turn it in a circular direction to get the drum over new shoes. Once on, the drum usually turned fine in these situations. John

  8. This is an ORIGINAL Avanti Parts Book, not one of the reproductions. As you know, the 1963-1964 Avanti Parts Book is quite a helpful resource, when we're working on our cars. Of course, the part numbers are great to have, when we're talking with the various Avanti parts sellers. But, I also find the individual part and systems illustrations in the Avanti parts book useful.

    This original Avanti factory parts book has very clear printing and sharp illustrations. Overall, this parts book is clean and in good shape. It's 100% complete. The only blemish to note is the loss of some of the black surface color on the outside back cover, as shown in one of my photos.  No text printing was lost, of course. It looks like there was a sticker of some kind on the outside back cover, and someone peeled it off (along with some of the black).

    The price for this Avanti Parts Book is $35, plus the cost of U.S.P.S. Media Mail shipping. Thanks for looking. John

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  9. This is a "working" ORIGINAL Avanti Shop Manual. By that I mean a factory Avanti shop manual you can use, while actually doing stuff on your car. It's not a manual to display with your car at a show. You can use your mint manual or a repro for that!

    This original manual is reasonably clean throughout. It's NOT marred by greasy fingerprints throughout the interior pages. As you can see, there is some wear in the corners and leading edge of the front cover. This manual is 100% complete, with all pages secure. I like the original glossy paper, and the original photo quality of the genuine Studebaker Avanti Shop Manual. By the way, the covers and interior pages are white. My camera exposure seems a little off on the first four photos.

    The price is $35, plus U.S.P.S. media mail shipping. Thanks for looking. And, please also check out my posting for an original Avanti Parts Book I have for sale. John

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  10. Hi, Gang. I have some back issues of “The Avanti Magazine” for sale. There are some early numbers from the 1970's available. As you know, this is the publication of the Avanti Owners Association International. Each issue is quite well done, with lots of photos, technical tips, and Avanti history features.

    Here are issues I have available at this time. Buy one or more. Issues 30 to 34, 102, 104 to 109, 128 to 132, 135 to 148, 150 to 153, 155, 156, 159, 160, 162, 168 to 171. The price is $4 per issue, plus shipping. Thanks for looking. John in Wisconsin

  11. Hi, Gang. I have some back issues of “The Avanti Magazine” for sale. There are some early numbers from the 1970's available. As you know, this is the publication of the Avanti Owners Association International. Each issue is quite well done, with lots of photos, technical tips, and Avanti history features.

    Here are issues I have available at this time. Buy one or more. Issues 30 to 34, 102, 104 to 109, 128 to 132, 135 to 148, 150 to 153, 155, 156, 159, 160, 162, 168 to 171. The price is $4 per issue, plus shipping. Thanks for looking. John in Wisconsin

  12. Hi, Gang. I have some back issues of “The Avanti Magazine” for sale. There are some early numbers from the 1970's available. As you know, this is the publication of the Avanti Owners Association International. Each issue is quite well done, with lots of photos, technical tips, and Avanti history features.

    Here are issues I have available at this time. Buy one or more. Issues 30 to 34, 102, 104 to 109, 128 to 132, 135 to 148, 150 to 153, 155, 156, 159, 160, 162, 168 to 171. The price is $4 per issue, plus shipping. Thanks for looking. John in Wisconsin

  13. And, a bunch of smiley faces to you and the other forum readers, Glenn. Yes, the experiences shared by our fellow posters here on the website are most valuable. The "been there-done that" help we get from members is remarkable. It results in more Avanti automobiles being on the road AND enjoyed by their owners! Here's to a Happy New Year ahead....one filled with even more Avanti fun (if that's possible!). John

  14. Yes, Glenn. As my posted indicated, "lost on him (Rick)".....but certainly not on other readers. Hopefully, someone here will be able to use the Seattle craigslist frame....It sure looked solid, especially compared to most frames that spent time in the Midwest or the northeast. Hard to believe (for me), but we're at 55-56 years of age....over half a century....on a 1963 model year Avanti frame. My, how time does fly! John

  15. I see Rick64R2 last visited the AOAI forum on October 26, so most of this helpful discussion has been lost on him. Too bad, since that restored frame on the Seattle craigslist looks like a gem for the money. Hard to figure why anyone would start patching a rusty Avanti frame or convert a Lark frame, when this restored one is available for an asking price of $2,000. But, each to his own. Merry Christmas, Gang. John

  16. I wouldn't worry about that, Daryl. Personally, I'd use something like a carriage bolt (no hex head, no slotted head) for a nice rounded appearance.This would resemble a rivet from the engine compartment side. Cut the bolt to length, if needed, although I've seen very short ones at the hardware store. You can also round the square shoulder under the carriage bolt head with a grinder or file, if needed. That's not a big deal...I've done that many times, when I wanted a rivet "look", but didn't want to (or couldn't) use a real rivet.  To me, a pop rivet will always look....like a pop rivet from the top. While a pop rivet would certainly be functional, it would seem very unfactory-like in appearance.

    Just one other quick thought, in case you were wondering: I haven't looked at my all-original '63, but I believe the rivet (or whatever) and the threaded holddown bracket are painted body color. Someone will correct me on this, if needed.  John

  17. I still have fond memories of my 1972 Avanti II, with the factory 400 c.i. small block Chevy engine. Seems like I was always fixing something on the car....but, man, when it was on the road, it could scare the crap out of you. Very fast off the line, and very quick winding. That Chevy 400 engine really moved the fairly heavy Avanti II along. But, predictably, all this horsepower. and torque really made the car's rear end want to get sideways on you. John

  18. The mercury switch that operates the trunk light is prone to failure after all these years. I believe it's something about the make-up of a mercury switch itself, since I've also had the mercury trunk light switches on older Buicks and other GM cars go bad, as well. On the older Buicks, it's actually "rare" to find an original one that still operates.

    Due to the prohibition on mercury use these days (now gone from thermometers and residential heating system thermostats), I don't have a suggestion for a replacement switch. Perhaps someone on the forum will. John

  19. 23 hours ago, schuyler said:

    I understand that a Studebaker vender has a replacement, but it seems over priced to me. Is there a more economical replacement. Or am I being a bit to thrifty?

    I see you also like Corvettes. so perhaps you aren't a "CASO" like me. I bet you've purchased Corvette parts in the past that "seemed overpriced to you".  Would you put a generic aftermarket exterior mirror on a nice older Corvette? If you would, then look for exhaust extensions for your Avanti at Wal-Mart or AutoZone. If not, consider keeping your Avanti original (assuming it's not already modified),  and patronize one of the Studebaker parts vendors for the extensions. John

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