Jump to content

Radio Removal from '69 build w/ Airconditioning


Recommended Posts

The antenna is broken off of our RQA 0330, and the radio doesn't work (at least I was told it only makes harsh noises....I didn't try it). I have a replacement antenna & will install it soon to re-check the radio. If the antenna isn't the true issue, what is the best way to remove the radio from the dash (the radio is the original AM with the little shiny strip to hide the Studebaker name). The car has AC & it almost looks like removing the entire dash is the only way. Any advise is appreciated.

Mike & Sonya

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not at home to check, but I think the Stude Avanti shop manual should have a procedure for that.

Do a search of this website using the search field to the upper right of the page... click "this topic", choose "Forums", and type "radio removal" in the search field before clicking the magnifying glass.

Here is a link to some instructions:

https://www.studebakerparts.com/studebakerparts/store/s/html/pages/avantiam-fm.html

Here is another approach to adding a modern sound system:

http://www.crutchfield.com/S-1BdUwWYqx0l/learn/customcar/showroom/BillH_Avanti.html

I replaced an original radio, but it was so long ago I've forgotten how I did it... my suspicion is that I was able to remove the unit by pulling one end through the speaker cut-out atop the dash, but that I had to uncover the right side of the console to get my arm up to maneuver the radio, and that I shaved the edges of the speaker opening somewhat to accomplish it, (cuts covered by the speaker grill outer perimeter)... but, my memory may be failing me. I do know it wasn't easy! I think I still have that radio.

Hopefully someone who has done it recently (or has a better memory) will chime in here.

Edited by WayneC
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, the Chuck Collins instructions are going to be very helpful. As he mentioned, the manual completely forgot about addressing the radio. I hope that the antenna fixes the problem so I dont' have to deal with pulling the radio. At least all of my heater hoses are brand new & flexible in case I do need to remove it.

thanks,

Mike & Sonya

Link to post
Share on other sites

When you replace that antenna, make sure it's grounded somewhere solid. Standard auto antennas self-ground to the car's metal body. For an Avanti there needs to be a separate ground run to the frame. If it's not grounded the radio will not perform well, if at all.

Also, once the antenna is properly installed...and if the radio works ok...you still need to "trim" the antenna. That's pretty much a lost art since car radios are now electronic and digital. To trim the antenna, take off the right (tuning) knob and dummy knob behind it. That will expose a hole above the shaft and you can see a small screw behind it. Tune the radio to a station close to 1400 kz, then use a small screwdriver and turn the screw back and forth until you have the strongest reception. Once done, you have the antenna trimmed.

One other thing you might consider doing...get some tuner or electronic cleaner with a plastic spray tube and squirt it inside the radio from any access places you can see. Cleaning the tuner should help with any noise issues and may help the tuner indicator to move more easily.

Best of luck and hope you don't need to remove the radio.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Holy cow...you sure brought back some memories with that radio advise....it's been years since I've done that. I've still got some tuner cleaner that I use on the old 8 track stereo out in the shop. Yes, the antenna does have a long strip of metal running under the carpet which I assume is a ground strip.

Mike S

Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, I know some of you old timers have been waiting for this......just how do you reinstall the antenna??? There doesn't appear to be enough room between the trunk floor and the opening in the quarter panel to get the end of the antenna up thru the hole.

I sure hope you don't say that you have to bend it a little.....as I just spent some time getting it straight because it already had a bend in it.

thanks,

Mike S

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm taking it that you have a non-retractable antenna. If I remember correctly it's installed from above...snake the antenna cable through the hole and the mast then goes base first into the body.

Link to post
Share on other sites

No, it is an original retractable antenna. This is how I finally got it in......instead of collapsing it as short as possible (like my first attempt), I removed the spare tire then stretched the antenna to it's full length to make it as flexible as possible. I could then bow the smallest section enough to get it into the hole. From there I just kept bowing and shoving the other 2 sections up thru the hole. This does bend the antenna. I then carefully straightened it back out. You just have to be very careful to avoid a kink instead of a gentle bend. This is how they must have done it at the factory.....I don't see any other way to get the job done.

Mike S

Link to post
Share on other sites

When I said "non-retractable" I mean an antenna that doesn't completely retract into the body and only leaving the tip exposed. The original Studebaker Avanti antenna retracts down but not internally, flush with the body. The original design leaves about a third of the antenna rod exposed when retracted. A completely retractable antenna should be easy to fit from underneath. The antenna I installed on my '70 completely retracts into the trunk area...outside of adding a ground cable to it, it was an easy install. I bought it at Pep Boys or Auto Zone if I remember.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm...my car was built in Sept '69 & the antenna was identical to the replacement antenna, which came from a wrecked '64 Avanti. The "mast" is in 3 sections, with the lowest part fixed to the base, meaning it will not retract into the car body at all. Stretched out, the 3 sections are nearly 4 feet long. Section 2 will retract with only 2 inches exposed above section 3, and section 1 will retract completely into section 2.

I'm still curious as to how they installed them at the factory. I forgot to mention in my earlier post that I did remove the "extension" from the bottom of the antenna base (attached via bayonet lugs) to help squirm the thing up into position.

I'll post a photo tonight if I can.

BTW......at least I found the Jack handle during this exercise!!!

Mike S

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

We were at an antique store today & ran across a new-in-the-box Midland brand radio.....am/fm/8 track. Looks to be late 60's / early 70's manufacture. We were on the bike & the saddle bags were already overflowing, so I didn't pick it up. What are the chances this thing would fit into the dash of my '70 Avaniti without modification?

thanks,

Mike Sal

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd say the chances are just about zero if you really mean 8-track... 8-track players were large units, mounted by the factory beside the console on the passenger side.

There were some period cassette player radios that can fit. I am not at home today to check and my memory is bad, but my 1980 Avanti came with a (Blaupunkt?) radio/cassette player...I believe the radio station indicator face swings inward to allow the cassette to enter; may have required a slight modification of the original Stude rectangular hole, but very minor.

This might be a better approach: http://www.instructables.com/id/Bluetooth-Upgrade-Your-Old-Car-V2/

(haven't researched it to see if it's feasible for the Avanti radio, but it may be)

Edited by WayneC
Link to post
Share on other sites

You might find what you're looking for on ebay or even Craig's List. Back in the 70s and 80s, most of the Japanese electronics companies offered aftermarket radios that had adjustable knob shaft spacing so they would fit a variety of models. I picked up a couple of Sanyo AM/FM/cassette radios, new in the box, and they fit both my 74 Avanti and 78 El Camino. The only important requirement was that the dash panel where the radio mounts be vertical -- which it is on all Avanits and a lot of late Studes, too. It's been a lot of years since I installed it, but I think I was able to get it in through the original speaker opening -- which is not used for a speaker on my car. The Sanyo model FTV 100 radio performance is acceptable -- about equal to the OEM radios. Better ones were available from Kenwood and Panasonic

It looks like the control shafts are adjustable between about 5.25" to 6.5", which allows installation in a lot of different vehicles..

Edited by Skip Lackie
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...