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Power Steering Control Valve


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Does anyone have a cross reference and a supplier for the power steering control valve for and 82 and earlier Avanti? Mine has too much play that transfers over to the steering.  

I hope everyone is doing well in this huge crisis we are all going through. I am social distancing by working on my Avanti alone which sure beats just sitting around watchin TV or reading.

Thanks.

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Edited by Stuart Boblett
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Bear in mind that the control valve, by design, has some play in it.  This is how the shuttle valve controls the fluid flow.  When the engine is not running, this play is very obvious, and many mechanics assume that it is the source of steering "slop".   So, before you get into a lot of work and/or expense, check out the rest of the steering.  I have found that the most common source of sloppy steering is the center bellcrank bearings/bushings , or sometimes a loose pinch bolt, or incorrect end play.  A little wear here translates into noticeable play in the steering. A shop manual is very helpful in troubleshooting the steering. 

All that said, remember that the steering designs of the '50s (which is what you really have) are not tight like the rack and pinion systems to which we have become accustomed.  At their very best, there will still be some play.

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Thank you Jim, you may have saved me the expense and disappointment if this did not solve the problem.  Mine has much more play then a friend's 77 so I had his mechanic take a look at it and this was his diagnosis. I may compare his play to mine in the same configuration to confirm.  I had it aligned by a local shop and asked them about the play and they said it was ok but I am not convinced. It may be hard these days to find someone who is familiar with the old center bellcrank and kingpin systems. Thanks and stay safe, hopefully I may run into you sometime at a show, I am in Roanoke.

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Another thought just came to mind...  A number of years ago, I was having a problem with play in the steering on my '78.  After much searching, I found that the steering box was actually moving on the frame.  IIRC, the steering box that was used in that era was no longer the Studebaker box, but one from a fork lift.  The holes in the box were oversize for the diameter of the bolts that mount it to the frame.  Tightening the bolts cured the problem.  The easy check for this is to have an assistant rock the steering wheel +/-  about 30 degrees while you watch the steering box for any motion. 

As far as the bellcrank,  while you or your mechanic are under the car, grab the bottom end of the bellcrank where the tie rods are attached.  Try to move it up/down.  Any movement there suggests a possible problem with the center pivot, or the pinch bolt that hold the bellcrank to the shaft.. 

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2 hours ago, Jim78 said:

Another thought just came to mind...  A number of years ago, I was having a problem with play in the steering on my '78.  After much searching, I found that the steering box was actually moving on the frame.  IIRC, the steering box that was used in that era was no longer the Studebaker box, but one from a fork lift.  The holes in the box were oversize for the diameter of the bolts that mount it to the frame.  Tightening the bolts cured the problem.  The easy check for this is to have an assistant rock the steering wheel +/-  about 30 degrees while you watch the steering box for any motion. 

As far as the bellcrank,  while you or your mechanic are under the car, grab the bottom end of the bellcrank where the tie rods are attached.  Try to move it up/down.  Any movement there suggests a possible problem with the center pivot, or the pinch bolt that hold the bellcrank to the shaft.. 

Thank you Jim, this is really a help. I am going to give these a try. I appreciate the offer, I do have the original maintenance manual but appreciate your offer. 

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Quote

 

Steering Play

Lots of play in the steering...

·      Check the center pivot cinch bolt. The steering bell crank is attached to the pin by means of a grade-8 bolt that must be tight to secure the bell crank to the pin. If the bolt is loose, there will be up and down movement and lots of steering play. The torque spec on the pinch Bolt?  60 to 65 Ft. Lb.

·      Check all tie rod ends for play.  With the steering wheel centered on the steering gear high point, the wheels should be pointed straight ahead. If this is not the case, the car needs to go in for an alignment and the tie rods properly adjusted.

·      Check the steering gearbox adjustment, and the steering gearbox bolts.

 

There was a lot of up-and-down free-play on the steering bell crank on my car.  The cinch bolt was torqued to 65 ft./lbs., and now there is no longer any free-play.  After this adjustment, the car tracks like it’s on rails!

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