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StudeNorm

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Posts posted by StudeNorm

  1. I just removed the steering wheel and chopped, Dremeled away the plastic rim. Once done the wheel fell apart in my hands. Upon examining the welded area I was a bit/a lot surprised to see there was no fusing of the rim metal to the spoke metal. In other words, not a true weld... There was only a thin layer of welding rod material spanning the gap on the top side holding the assembly together. If they had welded top and bottom like this it would have been better. I am surprised it lasted this long. Not sure if this was standard practice or a lack of proper QC. Needless to say an aftermarket wheel could not be made to fit so I will continue with my repair. Pictures to follow.

  2. Thanks for the re[plies, all. It looks like welding will be the solution. The car is trapped on the hoist while I use the space under it during some home reno projects anyways so I will pull the steering wheel and see what I can get done during this lockdown period. Colour matching the resin might be fun but I don't mind a good challenge . Cheers.

  3. The hog troughs are accessible from the very rear over the top of the frame. They may also have drain holes in them at front and back. I got into mine with a boroscope and found a dead bird and various and sundry other things that the squirrels brought in. I would think that if you don't want to drill your body panels you can get creative and find a way to use a scope and a very long nozzle to spray the bolt threads in the troughs. Might take a bit of contorting to get things aligned or just fire a bunch of lube at high pressure and coat it all but the point being when you get it apart cleanup will be easy. Good luck.

     

  4. The other day I went for a spin and upon entering the car I had a hold of the wheel and pulled on it a bit to adjust my butt in the seat and felt a funny movement, in the steering wheel, not my seat. The wheel now has a back and forth wiggle where the rim meets the spoke, one side only for now. It feels broken at that point. Is it possible to repair or will it need replacing? I have a welder but realize the plastic will have to be removed and then replaced. Does anyone have an old wheel in decent shape I can buy? What are my options for a good looking after-market replacement? My interior already has some minor mods. Thanks for your help.

  5. Turkey baster...  cut the end off the baster to a point where it fits over the pushrod, draw the lifter up a bit (1/4" or so) squeeze the bulb and off pops the lifter.

     

  6. I have a Dave T pump on my R2. I spent a lot of time and money trying to get a correct rebuild kit only to box up the old pump/kits and get one fully configured and ready to go from Dave. It has been working like a charm for years now.

  7. The serial number is a 1963 but some things look odd. My '63 had an alternator. This one has chrome valley cover and rocker covers. My auto trans had the dip stick tube accessed from the engine compartment. The one you show needs to be accessed through the floor. Someone here will know that tranny.

     

  8. When I bought my R2 back in 2013 it came with the tires that were installed when it was rebuilt back in 1985: Goodyear Eagle GT's. The date code was only 3 numbers but definitely manufactured in 1985. I guess the rebuilder decided Blake had the right idea. BTW, I drove the car home, almost 800 miles, on those 28 year old tires and even had it up above triple digit speeds for a short burst or two but reason finally set in and I swapped them for a set of modern Mickey Thompson street sport tires.

  9. I did an alt conversion to a '85 (or so) toyota single wire 60 amp system. It was too easy. Took my old alt to a rebuilder/supplier who took one look at it and came out with the replacement. Wiring was easy. Used info from Bob Johnstone's pages. Ammeter still in cct. On the car for 5 years now. It almost looks factory.

    Avanti_alt2.jpg

    Avanti_alt1.bmp

  10. I had a discussion at a small show and shine with a couple of fellows who said the Avanti looked like the Jensen. They were sure Studebaker did the copying, not the other way around. Even after they were told my car was a '63 and the Interceptor didn't come out until '67. Some folks just make me shake my head...

  11. I have the StratoVue mirrors mounted on the fenders and they look great, but... For driving I have had door mounted mirrors on some of my other Studes and that is a better position for them, functionally.

    I have used this method to install seatbelts. Not on an Avanti but other Studes... Mounting the seatbelts is simply get the car on a hoist and find the brackets with the holes, poke a pin up through the carpet and use an exacto to perforate the carpet for the bolt. Install and drive safe.

  12. I have done a couple of rebuilds on my ps and it is starting to get worn and weak. With the motor idling the pressure is low enough that it is hard to turn when sitting still so a blip of the throttle is needed. Time for me to replace it but I have a WHOLE bunch of other projects that need doing first. You may have the same problem. The pump, not the project count.

  13. What studegary said.

    There are areas of the steering linkage that can wear but if it is so severe that it can't be set up for basic alignment you would find the problems post haste. I had a Lark with worn upper and lower pins on one side. They were SO worn that the outer shells were cracked and the pin was oval. This was found about 3 minutes after I got the car up on my hoist. It was still mostly aligned even with this problem, but it was really sloppy to drive. You need a second opinion.

  14. I got my info from Bob Johnstone's Studebaker site. When I bought the alternator I went to an auto electrical store and simply asked for a 1985 Toyota single wire style and put my old alternator on the bench. The fellow took one look at it and said "don't go anywhere". He came back 2 minutes later and put the Toyota alternator on the bench beside my old one. The pulley was a bit different but otherwise they were pretty much identical. I paid about $85, took them both home, swapped pulleys and fitted it on the car. A very small amount of grinding was needed. Bob's instructions gave me a good idea of wiring and after studying the old wires I was able to make it operational using only one very short jumper and some creative splicing. See pics...

    I am up in Canada's arctic right now or I would see if I could find any numbers on it for you. I return late Friday so if you can wait...

    later

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