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Stuart Boblett

Help with CCM / ECM and all the anti smog stuff

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I have a newly acquired 82 with all the computer controlled carb and other stuff as well as the smog pump (maybe CA car) and associated junk. I have been corresponding with several other owners who replied to a different thread but thought I would post an additional thread in case some one who might wish to input. I would like a good description and advise on how to eliminate the standard computer controlled carb and all the related stuff as well as eliminating the smog pump and all the plumbing and wires associated with it. Does anyone else have any suggestions or comments. Thanks everyone.

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How many miles are on your car?  Depending on mileage and how good the engine's internal condition is, you might be better off buying and installing a new crate engine with a new intake and carburetor.  I'm not trying to spend your money for you but trying to determine what might be the most out-effective way to go...even if it means driving the car as-is for a while while you get the package together.  If you go the crate engine route you can get an engine optimized for the type of use you plan on giving the car.  Once you start dumping money and effort into your current engine it can become a money pit.  Quadrajets...as good a carburetor as they are (were), are getting harder to find in decent condition...not too many carb rebuilders understand the Q-jet that well if at all.  Buying an assembly-line rebuilt Q-jet is dicey at best.

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AS I said in the last post, I replaced the engine and eliminated all the parts of the system. It's basically a separate system but a bit of knowledge of what not necessary and what needs to be plugged is suggested.

I'm not sure how to help without knowing your comfort level under the hood. It's also important to know how the car currently runs. If it runs well the it might be best to just leave it but if it's not running well a new carb and distributor could help as that would eliminate them as a cause. 

The problem with poor running could also be a worn cam, bad timing chain, bad sensors and chasing these leads can get frustrating and pricey.

I would recommend if your's is running well, drive it. If it's not - contemplate the cost of a rebuilt engine to replace the old bullet which is not great technology at best.  

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1 minute ago, Avanti83 said:

...contemplate the cost of a rebuilt engine to replace the old bullet which is not great technology at best.  

Absolutely.  The old technology wasn't bad technology...it simply wasn't a high point in automotive technology history.  Manufacturers were trying to comply with federal EPA regulations and fuel economy standards as best they could and simplicity and performance were afterthoughts and relatively unimportant.  

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2 minutes ago, Gunslinger said:

Absolutely.  The old technology wasn't bad technology...it simply wasn't a high point in automotive technology history.  Manufacturers were trying to comply with federal EPA regulations and fuel economy standards as best they could and simplicity and performance were afterthoughts and relatively unimportant.  

True, the GM Computer Command Control System with its finicky computer controlled carburetor, did not age well!:o

It was really just a 'stop gap' between the older (and very reliable) mechanical (vacuum) controlled carb and throttle body injection.

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The 58,000 mile engine runs pretty well with the exception of a fairly strong gasoline smell inside that I have not run down yet. It is not a power house for sure but will do for now.  My next step on that is to pull the rear seat and check the seal and hoses at the tank. So far I have not found a visible leak or dampness but there are many hoses in the system that I have not gotten to yet. I know the gasohol crap that is shoved down our throats is hell on rubber hoses and components in the carburetor. 

Edited by Stuart Boblett

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While I'm not sure if an '82 has one, but if your car has a charcoal canister to absorb gas fumes it might be saturated and that might be the cause of your gasoline smell.

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While we are on the subject of gas odor, check under the car and gas tank area looking for the short rubber line that connects the tank to the steel fuel lines. You may find it quite brittle or swollen. Even if it's not, contemplate replacing it with a short section of EFI quality gas hose. If it leaks or fails, the gas tank will empty wherever the car is setting creating a major fire hazard.

It can be changed by draining the tank at the "TEE" on the frame below the passengers side door which can be a challenge if the plug hasn't been removed before. Also be aware that the tank will not completely drain by this method and you could get up to a quart of gas out when you remove the hose under the tank. 

If you plan to remove the tank, it will only come out if you remove the 90 deg fitting on the tank bottom. Replace the 90 with a 1/4" pipe plug to keep from getting a gas bath also.

Replace any hoses with EFI quality ones, they cost a bit more but they can handle today's fuels.

Other sources of leaks around the tank are the gas filler connection to the tank, 2" hose and several hoses connecting the vent tubing system above the gas tank.

As an aside - When I drained the tanks on my 83, I added a shutoff valve on the rear side of the tee to let me close the gas line if I ever wanted to work on the lines from the tee to the engine. I have an EFI fuel pump and filter just in front of the TEE on it. On the 74, the shut off is under the tank as I added an electric fuel pump and filter there.

Edited by Avanti83

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The weld on the vent fitting at the top of the tank had cracked and caused a strong gas smell inside my 82 when I first got it.  I had the took out the tank and had it refurbished and coated inside and out.  No smells since then.

chuck

RQB-3553

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