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R1 fuel pump rebuild proceedure


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Here is the disassembly proceedure for the R1 fuel pump, I will add

text where it will be helpful, but the pictures should be sufficent.

The stock Studebaker fuel pump is similar, so most of this will apply

to that unit as well. If you have dialup, this might be a little bit

for you, hit the red X or the "Stop" button on your browser. If you

want to see a certain picture, right click it, and hit "show". I am

using a rebuild kit from Studebaker International, with a different

stem seal that is included in the "Cellar" kit :

Here is the pump, off the car, and cleaned :

fuel_pump_disassembly_001a.jpg

fuel_pump_disassembly_002a.jpg

fuel_pump_disassembly_003a.jpg

Closeup of the plug holding the pivot pin in :

fuel_pump_disassembly_004a.jpg

Put in a vice (carefully) pinched on the "nose", and the plug hit with

a center punch a few times to make a ridge. The material is pretty

soft, I found that a screwdriver would "grind" it away :

fuel_pump_disassembly_005a.jpg

I used a flat blade screwdriver and tapped around the edge, creating a

bump to pry against :

fuel_pump_disassembly_006a.jpg

Again with the flat blade, I chiseled (by hand) material away to gain

better access to the plug, and get it out from under the "stake" :

fuel_pump_disassembly_007a.jpg

Plug popped out. The plug has a MUCH longer tip on it, the one in the

kit is very stubby, and will allow the pin to move back & forth more.

I think I will tap the hole and modify a screw to plug the hole :

fuel_pump_disassembly_008a.jpg

Pin comes out with a little cleaning of the hole :

fuel_pump_disassembly_009a.jpg

fuel_pump_disassembly_010a.jpg

Edited by SBCA96
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Once the pin is out, the arm comes off :

fuel_pump_disassembly_011a.jpg

Down inside the housing :

fuel_pump_disassembly_012a.jpg

Remove the screws from the bottom :

fuel_pump_disassembly_013a.jpg

Crack it open :

fuel_pump_disassembly_014a.jpg

fuel_pump_disassembly_015a.jpg

Was happy to find the diaphram cracked (needs replacement) :

fuel_pump_disassembly_016a.jpg

fuel_pump_disassembly_017a.jpg

Assembly slides out :

fuel_pump_disassembly_018a.jpg

Apart :

fuel_pump_disassembly_019a.jpg

New diaphram to old diaphram :

fuel_pump_disassembly_020a.jpg

fuel_pump_disassembly_022a.jpg

New spring / old spring :

fuel_pump_disassembly_021a.jpg

Looks like the distance from the surface of the plug hole, to the pin

is about .350. Thats plenty to tap for a screw. Then I can remove

some of the threads from the screw to clear past where I dont tap, &

make it as long as the original plug tip was.

fuel_pump_disassembly_023a.jpg

Inside the upper housing :

fuel_pump_disassembly_024a.jpg

Decided I wanted the higher fuel pressure of the original spring :

fuel_pump_disassembly_025a.jpg

fuel_pump_disassembly_026a.jpg

fuel_pump_disassembly_027a.jpg

Disassembled :

fuel_pump_disassembly_028a.jpg

Old spring / new spring :

fuel_pump_disassembly_029a.jpg

Remove fuel bowl screws :

fuel_pump_disassembly_030a.jpg

Crack it apart :

fuel_pump_disassembly_031a.jpg

fuel_pump_disassembly_032a.jpg

Cut off the end of a nail, the head side might work easier :

fuel_pump_disassembly_033a.jpg

Clamp in your vice grips :

fuel_pump_disassembly_034a.jpg

Center over the valves :

fuel_pump_disassembly_035a.jpg

Gently tap them out - doesnt take much :

fuel_pump_disassembly_036a.jpg

Old valve assembly :

fuel_pump_disassembly_037a.jpg

fuel_pump_disassembly_038a.jpg

fuel_pump_disassembly_039a.jpg

Tom

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Modifications : I decided to go through with the tapping of the plug

hole and creation of a filler screw, I started with a brass 5/16 pan

head screw 1/2 inch long :

fuel_pump_modifications_001a.jpg

Turns out the pin is .250 diameter and the minor diameter of a 5/16

tap is .257, since its aluminum - you dont have to enlarge it. I ran

the tap down approx. .250 inch :

fuel_pump_modifications_003a.jpg

Here is the screw, turned the head down to .380 diameter, removed all

but the first .250 of thread, shortened to leave some pin movement :

fuel_pump_modifications_004a.jpg

Cleaned up the seat with the dremel and a file :

fuel_pump_modifications_006a.jpg

fuel_pump_modifications_007a.jpg

Comparison between new theaded plug and original soft plug :

fuel_pump_modifications_008a.jpg

Comparison to the stumpy plug supplied with the S.I. kit :

fuel_pump_modifications_009a.jpg

Proper installation of the stem seal :

fuel_pump_modifications_010a.jpg

fuel_pump_modifications_011a.jpg

Tom

I could just be like a Chiltons manual, and say "installation is the

reverse of removal" - but how often is that REALLY true?? ;)

Here is the correct way the valve goes together. I had to look at my

OWN picture above to make sure I had done it right! :blink:

fuel_pump_reassembly_001a.jpg

The mushroom shaped deal gets pounded in until its flush with the top

of the hole (or bottom), you CAN go too far - so dont!

fuel_pump_reassembly_002a.jpg

I used Loctite in the hole, just a little bit. You dont need much :

fuel_pump_reassembly_003a.jpg

fuel_pump_reassembly_004a.jpg

Wipe off the excess :

fuel_pump_reassembly_005a.jpg

Hammer it in. I used a wood block, that way I didnt harm my table, or

have to remove the fittings I just redid :

fuel_pump_reassembly_006a.jpg

Make sure you put this gasket on correctly. If you do it right, you

can blow through the assembly, if you put it on 180 degrees, then you

will "seal" the input, and no gas will get through. Thats bad.

fuel_pump_reassembly_007a.jpg

fuel_pump_reassembly_008a.jpg

I used a VERY light film of permatex on both sides of the gasket, I am

paraniod about fuel leaks. After looking at the way the diaphram goes

together, I realized that I COULDNT use permatex there. If you cant

use it both spots, its pointless to use it at all. If I had to do it

over, I wouldnt have used the permatex on the fuel bowl :

fuel_pump_reassembly_009a.jpg

fuel_pump_reassembly_010a.jpg

fuel_pump_reassembly_011a.jpg

fuel_pump_reassembly_012a.jpg

Then tighten the screws, I read that one thing to do to insure that it

doesnt leak after, you take the parts and use sandpaper or emery paper

and place it on a glass surface, then run the part back & forth until

you get a smooth uniform shiny part. I didnt want to do that since it

has a nice rough texture to the sealing surface, which seemed like it

would seal better then a smooth surface. Food for thought.

fuel_pump_reassembly_013a.jpg

You can see what oozed out - even though I used a little bit!

fuel_pump_reassembly_014a.jpg

Here is the stem seal installed on the old higher pressure spring :

fuel_pump_reassembly_015a.jpg

fuel_pump_reassembly_016a.jpg

Fits into the housing :

fuel_pump_reassembly_017a.jpg

This picture is deceiving, I first thought it would go together better

if I did it this way, but the instructions say to put the arm on first.

They are right, if you push the top of the shaft through the housing

and then stick the "fork" end under the "head" of the shaft, it will

hold it all together while you put the screws in. Nice.

fuel_pump_reassembly_018a.jpg

"Head" on the shaft :

fuel_pump_reassembly_019a.jpg

"Fork" under the head :

fuel_pump_reassembly_020a.jpg

Pin into the hole, through the arm :

fuel_pump_reassembly_021a.jpg

This is what concerned me about the "short" push plug. Though I didnt

measure it, it LOOKED like the short plug might allow the pin to move

over far enough to leave one side of the arm with no support and riding

in that necked down area in the center of the pin. Thats why I liked

the old longer nose pin better, and made my screw to match it :

fuel_pump_reassembly_022a.jpg

Arm installed, pin in, screw set, holding diaphram :

fuel_pump_reassembly_023a.jpg

Putting the screws in .. do NOT tighten them as you install them! Just

leave them loose for now.

fuel_pump_reassembly_024a.jpg

Here is the FUN part. Page 5 in the "Avanti Workshop Manual" in the

Studebaker shop manual, clearly states on step 7 :

Align the indentification file marks and install the

valve body-to-pump body attaching screws loosely.

Hold the cam lever in its maximum stroke position,

then tighten the attaching screws securely.

Oh Yah right! I need at LEAST two more hands to do that. I tried a

few different things, and none worked. My vice doesnt open wide enough

and tightening the assembly in an 8 inch C-clamp didnt work either. It

would pop right out. I figured out that if I marked the arm, and did

a few adjustments for fit, I could push the pump INTO the C-clamp with

the result being the arm at full stroke. Takes a few trys, I was able

to tighten the screws pretty well, then it popped out, I finished it

out of the clamp, but I think it was tight enough it didnt move back :

fuel_pump_reassembly_025a.jpg

Time to put that spring back on the arm. I put the end into the arm

first, and pryed it onto the bump in the housing :

fuel_pump_reassembly_026a.jpg

fuel_pump_reassembly_027a.jpg

All done .. ready to go back on the car :

fuel_pump_reassembly_028a.jpg

Tom

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