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Got the hood open on the 1988 Coupe


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Today I went back over to where the two 1988 cars are stored inside and worked on the stuck hood on the 1988 Coupe.
After a bit of work using the same methods I used to get the hood open on the 1988 Convertible, I was able to open the hood on this car as well.
The driver's side latch and the driver's side latch pin on the underside of the hood were heavily rusted (see photo below).
The spring inside the latch assembly on the driver's side is totally gone due to an extreme amount of rust in that latch.
I sprayed both latch assemblies with a lot of penetrating fluid once I got the hood open.
There is a LOT of leaves and other stuff crammed inside the nooks and crannies in the engine compartment.
It is so bad that in the front driver's corner of the engine compartment it is not possible to look down and see the ground or any suspension stuff because of the amount of crud stuffed in there (see photo below).
There is no electricity in this storage area making it difficult to take decent photos so the ones I have attached below are not very good.

1988_Coupe_drivers_hood_latch1.thumb.jpg.b866d9a90618f0a7e916d28171d1ecb7.jpg

1988_Coupe_crap_under_hood_frtdrvs.thumb.jpg.65fbd36cd8382ba939efc9e18f8f379e.jpg

I also worked on the stuck driver's door on this car but I was not able to get that open as of yet.
I was able to access the door latch assembly and confirmed that the door latch on this side is again very rusty but the inside door handle does work the rod and the release mechanism in the latch.
It seems like the lock part of the latch assembly is completely frozen.
I sprayed this down with a lot of penetrating fluid as well before I left for the day.

Edited by JensenHealey
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Re. the picture of the engine compartment - OMG!!!

Keep at it, I have faith that you WILL get that door open.

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Congratulations on the progress.  It looks like something made their home in that engine compartment.  Be careful cleaning it out. Wear a mask and gloves.  Hopefully, they did not chew on things like wires.  

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i've dug around in a few nasty car finds over the last 70 odd years, but nothing quite like what you're experiencing. curious as to what intrigued you about these two; cheap, given to you, long in the family, stubbborn, masochist, the challenge? would restoration be the goal? surely none of my business but your dedication sure is interesting!

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I got all three cars as a package deal through an employee of the Cafaro family. These two 1988 cars were stored outside behind one of the Carafo homes here in the Youngstown Ohio area for many years. The 1989 Convertible that is in much better condition was stored inside for a number of years at another Cafaro home in the Washington DC area. The two 1988 cars that were stored outside were last driven by JJ Cafaro's father inlaw and the story I was told that they are both wrecked because he was not a very good driver in his later years due to failing eyesight.

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The best penetrating oil I've used is called Kroil.  It's really great stuff...don't know if hardware or auto supply stores carry it...check a gun store.  Gunsmiths swear by it as it loosens rusted screws without harming the firearm itself.

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50% each atf and acetone is a terrific penetrator. once mixed it has to be kept tightly sealed or the acetone will evaporate. it has to be well shaken before each use also. in my experience, better than any commercially available alternative. 

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  • 3 weeks later...
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On 12/7/2020 at 11:22 AM, arkus said:

50% each atf and acetone is a terrific penetrator. once mixed it has to be kept tightly sealed or the acetone will evaporate. it has to be well shaken before each use also. in my experience, better than any commercially available alternative. 

 

I'll double that recommendation, the only thing we use in our shop. Keep the nozzle on the spray bottle closed when not in use because it will siphon  out of the bottle.

 

Good luck,

Jim Wood

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3 hours ago, IndyJimW said:

I'll double that recommendation, the only thing we use in our shop. Keep the nozzle on the spray bottle closed when not in use because it will siphon  out of the bottle.

 

Good luck,

Jim Wood

I can see that it would evaporate through the open nozzle.  How would it "siphon out"?  

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On 12/24/2020 at 2:08 PM, studegary said:

I can see that it would evaporate through the open nozzle.  How would it "siphon out"?  

If you set it on the bench with the nozzle open you will come back to a large puddle under your spray bottle. All of my mechanics in my shop have cleaned up enough of these messes to know.

Good luck,

Jim Wood

 

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I think the problem is semantics -- it's not really siphoning out.  What is happening is that the acetone is evaporating inside the bottle, and the excess pressure created thereby is forcing the acetone/ATF mixture out of the nozzle. Most of us have experienced the same physical process after parking a Studebaker with a full gas tank in the sun on a summer day.

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1 hour ago, Skip Lackie said:

I think the problem is semantics -- it's not really siphoning out.  What is happening is that the acetone is evaporating inside the bottle, and the excess pressure created thereby is forcing the acetone/ATF mixture out of the nozzle. Most of us have experienced the same physical process after parking a Studebaker with a full gas tank in the sun on a summer day.

Thank you, Skip.  This makes sense.

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2 hours ago, Skip Lackie said:

I think the problem is semantics -- it's not really siphoning out.  What is happening is that the acetone is evaporating inside the bottle, and the excess pressure created thereby is forcing the acetone/ATF mixture out of the nozzle. Most of us have experienced the same physical process after parking a Studebaker with a full gas tank in the sun on a summer day.

I have a 1 gal. can of acetone and 4 spray bottles of mixed sitting in a 60 degree shop under LED shop lights, I don't recall any pressure build up in any container.  I have siphoned fuel from vehicles and used shop air to pressure prime big diesels so I have a small amount of knowledge on the difference. Oh, I didn't mention that the spray bottles will continue to leak until the sides collapse inward from vacuum.

My point being, like I tell my mechanics is to keep the damn nozzle closed and stop making a mess.

Good luck,

Jim Wood

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8 hours ago, IndyJimW said:

I have a 1 gal. can of acetone and 4 spray bottles of mixed sitting in a 60 degree shop under LED shop lights, I don't recall any pressure build up in any container.  I have siphoned fuel from vehicles and used shop air to pressure prime big diesels so I have a small amount of knowledge on the difference. Oh, I didn't mention that the spray bottles will continue to leak until the sides collapse inward from vacuum.

My point being, like I tell my mechanics is to keep the damn nozzle closed and stop making a mess.

Good luck,

Jim Wood

Depending on the bottles and the shape of the tube/nozzle, I can understand siphoning once a flow is started.  Expansion/evaporation would be necessary to start the flow (unless the bottles have an inverted U for an outlet/nozzle and that is already full).  I agree - just keep them closed.  

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57 minutes ago, studegary said:

Depending on the bottles and the shape of the tube/nozzle, I can understand siphoning once a flow is started.  Expansion/evaporation would be necessary to start the flow (unless the bottles have an inverted U for an outlet/nozzle and that is already full).  I agree - just keep them closed.  

Spray bottles (Like Windex spray bottles) use low pressure to draw the fluid up the tube from the bottom of the bottle. If the pump is bad or the inner tube is loose no fluid will get to the one-way valve to be sprayed out. Just like sucking on a hose to start siphoning gas from a fuel tank. If you ever got a mouth full of gas while stealing borrowing some gas late at night, that was low pressure, not expansion or evaporation that started the flow.

Good luck,

Jim Wood

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13 hours ago, IndyJimW said:

Spray bottles (Like Windex spray bottles) use low pressure to draw the fluid up the tube from the bottom of the bottle. If the pump is bad or the inner tube is loose no fluid will get to the one-way valve to be sprayed out. Just like sucking on a hose to start siphoning gas from a fuel tank. If you ever got a mouth full of gas while stealing borrowing some gas late at night, that was low pressure, not expansion or evaporation that started the flow.

Good luck,

Jim Wood

Yes, we agree.  Pressure at one end or vacuum at the other end gives the same result.   

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