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I've seen other brand alternators adapted for Studes, but there should be no reason why your Prestolite can't be rebuilt to like new by a competent rebuilder. When I had my '63 R1, I had my alternator rebuilt by a local shop and had it back the same day.

A potential problem with other alternators is if you use one with too high an output with the original electrical wiring it may cause problems. Often heavier gauge wiring is necessary.

If needed, I can put you on to a shop that does quality work and will accept units shipped in and will ship it back to you.

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I've seen other brand alternators adapted for Studes, but there should be no reason why your Prestolite can't be rebuilt to like new by a competent rebuilder.  When I had my '63 R1, I had my alternator rebuilt by a local shop and had it back the same day. 

A potential problem with other alternators is if you use one with too high an output with the original electrical wiring it may cause problems.  Often heavier gauge wiring is necessary.

If needed, I can put you on to a shop that does quality work and will accept units shipped in and will ship it back to you.

thanks for input. The shop I am using (a specialty shop) says the bearing in the front housing has seized into the housing--not unusual. the housing is pretty fragile and past attempts to press the bearing out (pound?) usually end with a broken housing. which cannot be sourced anymore. So he is soaking the assembly and working with it trying to separate the bearing from the housing. If successful, the rebuild will take very little time. all other parts are available. I am just trying to anticipate a broken housing and looking around at the alternatives. Thanks again.

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thanks for input.  The shop I am using (a specialty shop) says the bearing in the front housing has seized into the housing--not unusual.  the housing is pretty fragile and past attempts to press the bearing out (pound?) usually end with a broken housing.  which cannot be sourced anymore.  So he is soaking the assembly and working with it trying to separate the bearing from the housing.  If successful, the rebuild will take very little time.  all other parts are available.  I am just trying to anticipate a broken housing and looking around at the alternatives.  Thanks again.

To remove the bearing, use a dremel tool or other die grinder with a snall diameter cut off wheel. Cut the tnner race in two places and it should fall out. Then very carefully cut three or four slots across the outer race. Take care not to cut into the case. You should be able to take a small cold chisel and carefully break it out.

As a replacement any of the smaller Delco units with a built in voltage regulator should work.

I bought one for a Pontiac from Western Auto some years ago for $19.95 that incloded a lifetime warentee. Installed it in me Jaguar E-Type Has worked great ever since. Unfortunately Western Auto is no longer with us but any of the discount auto supplys have them at a reasonable price.

cbk 1984 black touring coupe#RQB3921 68 E-Type rdstr.

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To remove the bearing, use a dremel tool or other die grinder with a snall diameter cut off wheel. Cut the tnner race in two places and it should fall out. Then very carefully cut three or four slots across the outer race. Take care not to cut into the case. You should be able to take a small cold chisel and carefully break it out.

  As a replacement any of the smaller Delco units with a built in voltage regulator should work.

  I bought one for a Pontiac from Western Auto some years ago for $19.95 that incloded a lifetime warentee. Installed it in me Jaguar E-Type Has worked great ever since. Unfortunately Western Auto is no longer with us but any of the discount auto supplys have them at a reasonable price.

cbk 1984 black touring coupe#RQB3921 68 E-Type rdstr.

The shop informed me that the shaft is still securely attached to the bearing. Hence, no opportunity to cut the bearing into pieces. I'll be looking at it tomorrow. Anyone tried dry ice and/or heat to free these things up??

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The shop informed me that the shaft is still securely attached to the bearing.  Hence, no opportunity to cut the bearing into pieces.  I'll be looking at it tomorrow.  Anyone tried dry ice and/or heat to free these things up??

Well, the end of this saga is that I picked up the part--the housing with the shaft trapped by the inner race of the bearing--found a small puller that would apply force to the bearing retainer plate, and gently tapped and pulled the shaft out of the bearing. It should all be completed and back on the car by tomorrow nite. It was easy to see why so many of these have been broken. The web design doesn't leave much to apply pressure to when removing a recalcitrant bearing.

thanks to all who offered advice.

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